Stress


Meditation, mindfulness, relaxation techniques

Navy SEAL calming technique

This calming technique is called box breathing, and you can try it yourself. It will only take you 16 seconds to cycle through the method one time. Just repeat the cycle as long as it takes you to feel relaxed. Breathe in for four seconds. Make sure all the air has been expelled from your lungs before you start to inhale. Once you start sucking up your air, make sure to really fill those lungs. Hold your breath for four seconds. No more inhaling at this point, and don’t let any air escape yet. Exhale for four seconds. Let the air out of your lungs at an even rate for the whole stretch of time, and make sure to get it all out. Hold your lungs empty for four seconds. It may be tempting to suck in some more air immediately after letting it all out, but just hang on for four.

https://medium.freecodecamp.org/a-navy-seal-breathing-technique-you-can-use-to-keep-calm-when-coding-f05a66da8067
Basic Meditation techniques

http://bemindful.org/basicinstru.htm
Guided meditations

https://www.uclahealth.org/marc/body.cfm?id=22&iirf_redirect=1
Easy relaxation techniques

https://www.innerhealthstudio.com/
Relaxation Downloads

https://students.dartmouth.edu/wellness-center/wellness-mindfulness/relaxation-downloads

Techniques for managing stress

https://www.parkinson.org/pd-library/fact-sheets/techniques-managing-stress

Visualization and Guided ImageryGuided imagery and visualization are techniques used to help you imagine yourself being in a particular state. Recordings are designed to help you visualize yourself relaxing or engaging in positive changes or actions. These exercises can help you reduce anxiety, improve self-confidence, or cope more effectively with difficult situations. https://www.uhcl.edu/counseling-services/resources/visualization
“Meditation made easy”

https://www.headspace.com/

Many of the resources found on p. 141 – 143 in the student handbook can be found at https://www.parkinson.org/pd-library


How can I cope with stress?

It is not uncommon for the stresses of daily life — feeling overwhelmed, under prepared and over stimulated — to bring about anxiety and unrest. These psychological issues can be very important to your health, and even exacerbate the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. That is why it is so important to take a good look at what may be causing stress in your life and learn how to deal with the situations that give rise to anxiety.

Reducing stressors in life is not always easy. You might need to take a closer look at your life to find what needs to change. Sometimes just reducing the negative influences in your life can make a big difference. Here is what I do to reduce stress and overcome anxiety — and what you can try, too.

Turn off the news.  Overexposure to events that are beyond your control can create tension and worry.

Eliminate violent and mindless TV and stressful video games. Use that time to engage in a hobby or something you enjoy.

Minimize exposure to negative people. Instead, connect with people who uplift you.

Learn some relaxation techniques. Meditation, yoga and deep breathing can help restore a sense of calm. Seek a yoga class tailored to Parkinson’s patients.

Seek solace in music. Try classical, soft rock, nature sounds or alternative. Set up a comfortable listening area where you can fully enjoy the moment.

Stay passionate. If Parkinson’s takes something you love away or care about, find a hobby to replace it. If you can no longer paint, pick up a camera and take pictures or learn to sing.

Stay open-minded and resilient. This will help you handle adversity.

Exercise away the anxiety. Talk to your doctor or physical therapist about setting up an exercise regimen that meets your health needs.

Socialize.  Nothing can empower you like a feeling of camaraderie. Get involved with a community organization, a support group, or a charity that you believe in.

Learn to laugh. Keeping a sense of humor is a sure way to beat anxiety. Watch a funny video and read something that makes you laugh every day.

Remember, anxiety and depression often go together. But the symptoms of anxiety can include: feelings of panic, fear and restlessness, sleep disturbance, poor concentration, palpitations, shortness of breath, irritability, and dizziness.

If you feel that you are totally overwhelmed by your feelings, consult with your physician. He or she can refer you to a mental health professional. There is no shame in seeking help, when you need it. Everyone deals with his or her anxiety differently.

Read more

http://www.parkinson.org/understanding-parkinsons/newly-diagnosed/coping-with-anxiety