Anxiety


Meditation, mindfulness, relaxation techniques

Navy SEAL calming technique

This calming technique is called box breathing, and you can try it yourself. It will only take you 16 seconds to cycle through the method one time. Just repeat the cycle as long as it takes you to feel relaxed. Breathe in for four seconds. Make sure all the air has been expelled from your lungs before you start to inhale. Once you start sucking up your air, make sure to really fill those lungs. Hold your breath for four seconds. No more inhaling at this point, and don’t let any air escape yet. Exhale for four seconds. Let the air out of your lungs at an even rate for the whole stretch of time, and make sure to get it all out. Hold your lungs empty for four seconds. It may be tempting to suck in some more air immediately after letting it all out, but just hang on for four.

https://medium.freecodecamp.org/a-navy-seal-breathing-technique-you-can-use-to-keep-calm-when-coding-f05a66da8067
Basic Meditation techniques

http://bemindful.org/basicinstru.htm
Guided meditations

https://www.uclahealth.org/marc/body.cfm?id=22&iirf_redirect=1
Easy relaxation techniques

https://www.innerhealthstudio.com/
Relaxation Downloads

https://students.dartmouth.edu/wellness-center/wellness-mindfulness/relaxation-downloads

Techniques for managing stress

https://www.parkinson.org/pd-library/fact-sheets/techniques-managing-stress

Visualization and Guided ImageryGuided imagery and visualization are techniques used to help you imagine yourself being in a particular state. Recordings are designed to help you visualize yourself relaxing or engaging in positive changes or actions. These exercises can help you reduce anxiety, improve self-confidence, or cope more effectively with difficult situations. https://www.uhcl.edu/counseling-services/resources/visualization
“Meditation made easy”

https://www.headspace.com/

Many of the resources found on p. 141 – 143 in the student handbook can be found at https://www.parkinson.org/pd-library


Anxiety and depression

When facing a diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, it is understandable to feel anxious or depressed. But mood disorders such as anxiety and depression are real clinical symptoms of Parkinson’s, just as rigidity and tremor. In fact, at least half of all Parkinson’s patients may suffer from clinical depression at some point during the course of their disease, according to some estimates.

The good news: Over the past decade, researchers have placed increasing focus on investigating these aspects of the disease, and today we have a better understanding of how to treat mood disorders in Parkinson’s and increase quality of life.

Read more at https://www.michaeljfox.org/understanding-parkinsons/living-with-pd/topic.php?emotions-depression

 

Feeling worried is an understandable reaction to a Parkinson’s diagnosis. But when feelings of constant worry or nervousness go beyond what is understandable, a person may be experiencing anxiety, which is more serious.

Anxiety is a common nonmotor symptom of PD. It is important to note that anxiety is not simply a reaction to the diagnosis of Parkinson’s, but is instead a part of the disease itself, caused by changes in the chemistry of the brain. Estimates show that between 25 and 45 percent of people with PD experience an anxiety disorder at some point.

Read more at http://www.pdf.org/anxiety

There are two main types of treatment options for anxiety:  medications and psychological counseling (psychotherapy).  Depending on the severity of symptoms, psychotherapy can be used alone or combination with medication. NPF recommends a personalized, holistic and comprehensive strategy for the treatment of mental health problems, meaning that care should be tailored to each person’s individual health needs and preferences.

Read more at http://www.parkinson.org/understanding-parkinsons/non-motor-symptoms/anxiety/What-are-the-Treatment-Options-for-Anxiety

There are many different ways in which a person with Parkinson’s can experience anxiety. The following is a list of common anxiety disorders and a description of symptoms associated with each form. As many as two out of five people with Parkinson’s will experience one of these forms during the course of their illness.

Read more at http://www.parkinson.org/understanding-parkinsons/non-motor-symptoms/anxiety/What-are-the-Symptoms-of-Anxiety

Some people with Parkinson’s may experience anxiety including feelings of unease, worry and fear.

It is often a natural reaction to situations we find threatening or difficult. There are a number of ways of managing anxiety.

Read more at https://www.parkinsons.org.uk/information-and-support/anxiety