Monthly Archives: August 2018


Wisdom and advice for the newly diagnosed

Other pieces  of advice and wisdom:

  • Take your meds on time.
  • Cry when you need to.
  • Everyone’s journey is different.
  • Exercise.
  • It’s OK to ask for help!
  • Give yourself time to get your head around the diagnosis. Allow yourself time to grieve.
  • Don’t overthink having PD. Don’t dwell on it.
  • Keep a sense of humor. If you’ve never had one, it’s time to get one.
  • Try to stay away from stress. Stress makes PD symptoms worse. Eliminate what you can out of your life.
  • The more you stress, the worse the symptoms are.
  • Discipline yourself. Get what information you can on PD and then make a plan. Establish a routine on taking your meds on time. Keep a log/journal to take to your appointments.
  • Pray.
  • Exercise.
  • Stay away from Dr. Google.
  • Exercise your brain as well as your body. Word games. Number games. Play games with your grandchildren or your kids or friends.
  • Don’t let this be a death sentence.
  • Never, never, never, never, never give up.

And exercise.


Newly diagnosed advice from M.J. Fox Foundation

uest blogger Bev Ribaudo was diagnosed with Young Onset Parkinson’s at age 47, but her symptoms began in her late 30′s. Having always been an optimist, Bev decided to fight this disease using humor, sharing her observations at Parkinson’s Humor.

First, don’t panic. Go ahead and get mad, throw a fit, cry for a while, then get over it and get on with your life. It’s just Parkinson’s disease, it won’t kill you. It could be a lot worse, you could have cancer.

Read more

https://www.michaeljfox.org/foundation/news-detail.php?you-have-just-been-diagnosed-with-parkinson-now-what


Newly diagnosed advice from Davis Phinney Foundation

Hearing the words, “You have Parkinson’s disease,” is life changing. For some, a Parkinson’s diagnosis may mark the end of a long and frustrating search to explain a collection of different and seemingly disconnected symptoms. For others, a Parkinson’s diagnosis is a complete shock, filled with feelings of disbelief and despair. For everyone, a Parkinson’s diagnosis brings a new and unexpected journey.

Parkinson’s is not life-threatening, but it is progressive. This means that symptoms and effects of Parkinson’s will change and get worse over time. Parkinson’s is also very complex and can affect almost every part of the body, ranging from how you move to how you feel to how you think and process. When you are first diagnosed, the sheer amount of information and the uniqueness of each person’s experience of Parkinson’s can be incredibly overwhelming.

In this section, we help you navigate to the right information so you can get started on your path to living well with Parkinson’s.

Newly Diagnosed

 


Newly diagnosed advice from Parkinson.org

If you have been recently diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, you are not alone. Today many people with Parkinson’s are looking beyond their doctors alone to keep themselves well. We are here to help empower you by giving you the tools and information you need to lead a healthier, more independent life. Starting today you have the power to make a positive change in your life.

This section of Parkinson.org is unique; all of topics listed below have been written by people who have lived well with Parkinson’s for several years

http://www.parkinson.org/Living-with-Parkinsons/Managing-Parkinsons/Advice-for-the-Newly-Diagnosed

 


Speach and swallowing in PD

This booklet explains changes in speech, voice and swallowing that can affect people with Parkinson’s disease. Exercises for speech and voice along with advice for improved swallowing are included, along with advice on speech-language therapy and medications.

http://parkinson.org/pd-library/books/speech-swallowing

 

Changes in speaking, chewing and swallowing are common in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and can interfere with important parts of life, such as the ability to eat well. But they don’t always have obvious signs, and many people with PD are not aware of these difficulties, or don’t know how to describe them.


The Albany Guardian Society 2018 Fall 2018 Institute semester

The Albany Guardian Society 2018 Fall Institute semester offers programs in the following broad categories:

Read more at http://www.albanyguardiansociety.org/fall18catalog.php

  • Caregiving
  • Community Engagement
  • Health + Wellness
  • Housing
  • Legal
  • Professional Development
  • Technology

These categories offer a variety of selections on topics of importance to a wide audience. Please scroll down to see all of the Institute’s offerings for the Fall 2018 semester.

There is no cost to attend our programs; however, registration is required for each course you wish to attend. To register, simply press the “Register Button” next to the class description and complete the registration form. If you are unable to complete an online registration, please contact Albany Guardian Society and we will provide assistance.

If you have any questions regarding the Institute or are unable to attend a class once you have registered, please call Albany Guardian Society at 518-434-2140 or email us at ags@albanyguardiansociety.org.

 


October 11, 2018 Onondaga County Office for Aging – Living an Active Life with Parkinson’s Disease Conference

Conference Date – Thursday, October 11, 2018

Please join us for the Sixth Annual Onondaga County “Living an Active Life with Parkinson’s Disease” Conference. This free day of learning is offered by the Onondaga County Office for Aging and Upstate University Hospital’s HealthLink and it will be held at the Holiday Inn, 441 Electronics Parkway, Liverpool, NY 13088.

Check-in is from 8:15 am to 8:45 am and the program runs from 9:00 am to 2:15 pm and includes lunch.

The conference host, Susan Kennedy, will introduce the following speakers:

Sarah King, PT, DPT

– Redefining Your Diagnosis
– How to Build Your Parkinson’s Plan of Attack
– Exercise is Medicine – Movement Workshop
Michelle Burack, MD
Gut-Brain Connections in Parkinson’s
Fahed Saada, MD, Neurologist
Psychological Issues with Parkinson’s Disease

There is no cost for the conference and lunch but registration is required as space is limited. To register, please call Upstate Connect at 315-464-8668.

The deadline for registration is Friday, October 5, 2018.

Please feel free to print, post and distribute the attached flyer.

Thank you.

Ellen M. McCauley
Public Information Specialist

Onondaga County
Department of Adult & Long Term Care Services

(Aging, Mental Health, NY Connects, Protective Services, Veterans)
421 Montgomery Street, 10th Floor

Syracuse, NY 13202

Phone: (315) 435-2362 Ext. 4942; Fax: (315) 435-3129

Email: EllenMcCauley@ongov.net

Website: www.ongov.net; Department www.ongov.net/adult


Directions to Van Cortland Room at Beverwyck

40 Autumn Drive, Slingerlands, NY  12159

WE WILL MEET IN A DIFFERENT BUILDING AND DIFFERENT ROOM, THIS MEETING ONLY.

We will meet at the Van Cortland Room at Beverwyck Slingerlands.

GPS – 40 Autumn Drive, Slingerlands, NY 12159

Short version – go past the driveway you usually turn in to our normal meeting room.

Turn left at the first intersection at Autumn Drive

Park at the “Main Entrance” on the left.

Enter through the Main Entrance. Look for the Van Cortland Room, close to the entrance

Map

 

From the West: 

(Schenectady, Scotia, Glenville, Buffalo) Route 5 East, right on Route 155, left on Western Avenue (Route 20), right on Schoolhouse Road, left on Krumkill Road (1/2 mile), right onto Beverwyck Lane. Turn right at the second drivway on the right. Park and come in and join us.
Or, Route 7 East, to Route 87 South to end, left on Western Avenue (Route 20), right on Schoolhouse Road, left on Krumkill Road (1/2 mile), right onto Beverwyck Lane. Turn LEFT on Autumn Drive and look for the parking lot at the Main Entrance.

If the main entrance parking is full, drop off passengers and park in the nearby North or South lots.

 


From the East:

(Troy, Rensselaer, East Greenbush, Boston) Interstate 90 West to Slingerlands Exit 4 (Route 85W), to Krumkill Road Exit. At end of exit ramp, take a right on Krumkill Road (1 mile), left onto Beverwyck Lane.Turn right at the second driveway on the right. Park and come in.

Or, Route 9 South to Interstate 90 West, to Slingerlands Exit 4 (Route 85W), to Krumkill Road Exit, right on Krumkill Road (1 mile), left onto Beverwyck Lane.

Turn LEFT on Autumn Drive and look for the parking lot at the Main Entrance.

If the main entrance parking is full, drop off passengers and park in the nearby North or South lots.

 

 


From the South:

(Ravena, Coeymans, Catskill, NYC) NYS Thruway North to Exit 24, to Route 87 South (exit 1-S Western Avenue), left on Western Avenue (Route 20), right on Schoolhouse Road, left on Krumkill Road (1/2 mile), right onto Beverwyck Lane.

Turn LEFT on Autumn Drive and look for the parking lot at the Main Entrance.

If the main entrance parking is full, drop off passengers and park in the nearby North or South lots.

 

From the North:

(Clifton Park, Saratoga Springs, Adirondacks) I-87 (Northway) South to Route 87 South (exit 1-S Western Avenue), left on Western Avenue (Route 20), right on Schoolhouse Road, at the traffic circle take the second exit onto Krumkill Rd., then a right onto Beverwyck Lane.

Turn LEFT on Autumn Drive and look for the parking lot at the Main Entrance.

If the main entrance parking is full, drop off passengers and park in the nearby North or South lots.

 



New hope for Parkinson’s Cure

Japanese research team announced it will start human clinical trials for a new Parkinson’s disease treatment.
On Monday, a team from Kyoto University’s Center for iPS Cell Research and Application announced it will begin testing the new treatment on humans after successful rounds of animal trials. The injected treatment uses stem cells to help those with Parkinson’s diseases and received approval from the government.

Read more